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Neuroradiology

E3047. Not Your Typical Sinus Infection: Complications of Rhinosinusitis

Mavani P1,  Ngo A1,  Kriger L1,  Handler M1,  Yeretsian R.2 1. Atlantic Health Systems, Morristown Medical Center, Morristown , NJ; 2. Atlantic Health Systems, Overlook Medical Center, Summit, NJ

Address correspondence to A. Ngo (Anh.v.ngo@gmail.com)

Background Information: Anatomically, paranasal sinuses are in close proximity to vital structures including the brain and orbit. Infections involving mucosal lining of paranasal sinuses can spread to these adjacent vital areas as they share bony boundaries and blood supply. Recognition of complications of sinusitis is important for initiation of appropriate treatment.

Educational Goals/Teaching Points: We perform a case-based review of the imaging findings associated with complicated rhinosinusitis. After completion of this exhibit, the reader will be able to recognize the signs and symptoms of a complicated sinus infection, the common imaging findings related to the spread of infection, and the available treatment options.

Key Anatomic/Physiologic Issues and Imaging Findings/Techniques: We present cases of superficial complications (subgaleal abscess or Pott puffy tumor), and osteomyelitis, orbital complications (preseptal cellulitis and abscess, subperiosteal postseptal abscess, myositis of the extraocular muscles, and optic neuritis), intracranial complications (meningitis, epidural abscess, subdural empyema, cerebritis, brain abscess, and cavernous sinus thrombosis).

Conclusion: As many as 37 million Americans have at least one sinus infection each year. Recognition of complications of sinusitis is important for initiation of appropriate treatment.