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Neuroradiology

E2908. A Resident-Friendly Approach for Interpreting the Imaging of Cervical Spine Degenerative Disease

Segovis C,  Schroeder J,  Lack C,  Zapadka M. Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center, Winston Salem, 27101

Address correspondence to C. Segovis (cegovis@wakehealth.edu)

Background Information: The imaging of spine degeneration comprises a significant imaging volume in many radiology practices. However, interpretation of cervical spine imaging for degenerative disease can create anxiety in trainees because of interobserver and intraobserver variation. This exhibit presents a concise, algorithmic approach for the interpretation of imaging of degenerative disease of the cervical spine across modalities that is applicable to learners at all levels.

Educational Goals/Teaching Points: We present an algorithmic approach for interpreting the imaging findings of degenerative cervical spine disease based on accepted practices and available consensus guidelines. This approach is multimodal and include radiography, CT, and MRI. It includes an algorithm to systemically and concisely evaluate and report degenerative changes of the cervical spine. This algorithm will be applicable to radiography, CT, and MR. Although this approach is resident-friendly, it can be used by all learners as a more efficient means to interpret the degenerative spine. Also, this approach can be used by faculty to help teach degenerative spine imaging interpretation at the workstation.

Key Anatomic/Physiologic Issues and Imaging Findings/Techniques: Participants will have a focused review of anatomy of the cervical spine relevant to the evaluation of cervical spine degenerative disease with examples from radiography, CT, and MRI. We present examples of imaging protocols for optimal evaluation of disease and a resident-friendly, concise, algorithmic, multimodality approach for the interpretation of degenerative disease of the cervical spine. Although resident-friendly, this approach is applicable to all learners and to the teaching of degenerative spine imaging interpretation at the workstation.

Conclusion: Although imaging of degenerative disease of the cervical spine can comprise a significant part of a trainee’s practice, interpretation of cervical spine imaging for degenerative disease can create anxiety in trainees because of interobserver and intraobserver variation. This project presents a resident-friendly, concise, algorithmic approach for the interpretation of degenerative of the cervical spine across modalities. Our goal is to decrease resident anxiety, reduce interobserver and intraobserver variation, and provide residents with a tool that can be used daily in practice. This approach may also serve as an educational tool for all imagers with varying experience levels by presenting a more efficient means to interpret, and potentially teach, interpretation of degenerative spine imaging.